cloudcomputing

Event Report from Cloud Com 2017

Over the years, Cloud Com event has gradually become part of the panorama of milestones for the IT sector. Here, without particular concerns of hierarchization, the aspects which particularly questioned me are included in this event report from Cloud Com 2017:

1. The Cloud in the audience

For reasons of sovereignty, the public authorities operate in their own right a hundred private clouds. According to Jacques Marzin, Director of Disic (Interministerial Directorate of Information and Communication Systems), it is not at all incongruous to think that in the relatively short term information projects to citizens who are not particularly sensitive and whose democratic exercise calls for transparency are found in public clouds.

2. Cloud in the private

As far as the private sector is concerned, although the economic uncertainty persists, the demand for IaaS / PaaS is high in major accounts and midcaps, so this demand is being supported by very small companies, SMEs and midcaps.

3. The cloud, why?

To capture growth. Here are representative figures of the future challenges for which the Cloud is indispensable:

  • 3.2 billion mobile phones (today)
  • 420 million wireless health monitors (2018)
  • 340 billion sensors of all kinds (2018)
  • 450 billion transactions per day on the Internet (2020)

In a nutshell the world of tomorrow is pregnant with areas such as: Social, Mobility, Analytics and Cloud. The new era of computing will be that of cognitive systems. Today computers calculate, enable process automation and organize data; tomorrow they will learn, adapt and feel.

The recent predictions that IBM made some time ago are related to the 5 senses:

  • The view : a pixel is worth 1000 words
  • Smell : computers will have smell
  • Touch : It will be possible to touch via its phone screen
  • The taste : The good molecules will be assembled to make you eat more healthily while privileging your palatability
  • Hearing : Computers Will Hear What Matters

Computers will learn, adapt and predict the future. In the field of health, where knowledge doubles every five years, the interactions between machines and practitioners will multiply. The machines will ask questions, highlight causal relationships, and suggest to practitioners what decisions to make.

 

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